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Please provide a answer with {WHO/WHOM} to the following sentence :

Agencies have informed us that he was one of those __ they arrested last month.

Please note: I am aware of usage of both the words, but my answer is just in contradiction with a book's answer. So please don't provide links or references. A simple one word answer would suffice.

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marked as duplicate by Matt Эллен, RegDwigнt Mar 27 '13 at 16:54

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
web.ku.edu/~edit/whom.html –  SEL Mar 27 '13 at 5:10
    
This is Stack Exchange. A simple one-word answer will not suffice. –  St John of the Cross Mar 27 '13 at 8:09
    
@StJohnoftheCross You can post your reason along with it :p –  kushal Mar 27 '13 at 9:54

3 Answers 3

Agencies have informed us that he was one of those who arrested them last month.

Agencies have informed us that he was one of those whom they arrested last month.

Not as obvious as one should think

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Whom would be appropriate in formal English, but in both formal and informal contexts the relative pronoun may be omitted where, as here, it is the object of an integrated relative clause.

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One could also use that in place of who, whom, or which, and many do;
- Agencies have informed us that he was one of those that they arrested last month.

But it's equally grammatical and colloquial English to leave the relative pronoun out completely, in this case. If it is not the object of a preposition that precedes it, whom may always be omitted.
I.e, the correct sentence is
- Agencies have informed us that he was one of those they arrested last month.

The reason is that whom is always an object; therefore, if whom is correct, there is already a subject at the beginning of the relative clause (in this case, they). And relative pronouns may always be deleted if they are not the subject.

Why? Because they're not necessary. Relative pronouns are moved to the front of the relative clause mainly to mark them as being relative clauses. But we often delete object relatives because having two noun phrases together (those they in this case) is a marker of a relative clause, and the existence of a subject guarantees there'll be two NPs together.

Plus, whom is dead in Modern English, and most people don't use it correctly. The advice I always gave my students was, simply, Don't Use Whom. There's no situation where it's required and there's always a better alternative.

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