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This of course wasn't the only functionality that came with iCloud, but regardless, developers weren't exactly enthusiastic.

or

This of course wasn't the only functionality that came with iCloud, but, regardless, developers weren't exactly enthusiastic.

Are both correct?

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2  
"This of course wasn't the only functionality that came with iCloud but, regardless, developers weren't exactly enthusiastic." Because "regardless" is a parenthesis and there is no comma needed except to set it apart from the main sentence. –  MετάEd Mar 21 '13 at 3:17

1 Answer 1

No, both aren't correct (a generally meaningless term when applied to punctuation: only incorrect works), but they're both acceptable to someone or other. What's correct here depends on who's making the judgment. Comma rules are amoebic and amorphous. They vary with the writer, the editor, the style manual, and the linguist/grammarian/English teacher who looks at the sentence.

This, of course, wasn't the only functionality that came with iCloud, but, regardless, developers weren't exactly enthusiastic. [OK]
This of course wasn't the only functionality that came with iCloud, but, regardless, developers weren't exactly enthusiastic. [OK]
This, of course, wasn't the only functionality that came with iCloud; however, developers weren't exactly enthusiastic. [OK and better]
This of course wasn't the only functionality that came with iCloud; however, developers weren't exactly enthusiastic. [OK and better]

See this for so-called comma rules. Not everything is clear, but it's a generally very good analysis of how to use commas. Don't take the names of the comma types seriously unless you want to be confused. Just look at how Trask uses them and what he says is proper use.

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Thank you very much! Very helpful answer! –  Steqheu Mar 21 '13 at 3:51
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I think your claim that “comma rules are amoebic” (ie, relating to, or caused by an amoeba) is incorrect. –  jwpat7 Mar 21 '13 at 3:59
    
@jwpat7: Why? They make as much sense as the world's #1 amoebically induced condition: amoebic dysentery, & the end result (pardon the pun) is olfactorily and structurally isomorphic writing, IMHO. :-) –  user21497 Mar 21 '13 at 4:19
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+1 Beautiful answer. @jwpat7 You are viewing this use of "amoebic" in an exceedingly narrow and very literal interpretation. One of the wonderful things about English, however, is the potential to use words in creative ways, and Bill Franke has come up with a colorful, inventive use of the term "amoebic" here. Think of how amoebae exhibit continuously and elusively mutating shapes, and you'll get an idea of what Bill means with regard to comma rules. –  John M. Landsberg Mar 21 '13 at 6:07
    
@JohnM.: Thank you, John. Just so. As Lakoff and Johnson's title says, Metaphors We Live By. –  user21497 Mar 21 '13 at 6:42

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