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I run a web service where customers submit an image with a description what needs to be edited, and editors compete with prices to get that editing job.

I want to put the following sentence in an web ad:

Our editors compete to get your job.

Just wondering whether it sounds like they want to take over the customer's proper job.

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1 Answer 1

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That the editors “want to take over the customer's proper job” is a possible interpretation of ”Our editors compete to get your job”, but not so likely an interpretation that I see it as a concern. Also consider “Our editors want your job”.

It may be that you mean there is a pool of editors bidding against each other for the job. The example sentence does not particularly convey that meaning, although it too is a possible interpretation. For specificity you could say “Our editors compete amongst themselves to get your job” or “Our editors compete amongst themselves to do your bidding” etc.

For briefer versions, but perhaps missing some nuances, consider “Multiple editors compete for your business” or “Our many editors compete for your business” or “Our many editors compete for your job”. “Our editors compete to do your work” is not bad, but add many after Our if you have room. Or, “Numerous editors compete to do your work”.

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You've been very helpful. Thanks a lot! –  Bonzoq Mar 19 '13 at 18:15
    
What I mean is exactly what you think, i.e. that there is a pool of editors bidding against each other for the job. Because the length of the text that I can place in that ad is limited the sentence that you suggested: “Our editors compete amongst themselves to get your job”, which is brilliant to me, is too long. If I said: "Our editors compete to do your work" would that be more clear, or more confusing? Again, I appreciate your help very much. –  Bonzoq Mar 19 '13 at 18:21
    
@Bonzoq, see added paragraph –  jwpat7 Mar 19 '13 at 18:26
    
Now I see. THANK YOU this is great! –  Bonzoq Mar 19 '13 at 18:51

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