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"You gotta love xyz" is an often a sarcastic (and colloquial) way of pointing out a preference/like for something. Is there a more formal way to express similar sarcasm when describing a preference/like?

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closed as not a real question by coleopterist, Kristina Lopez, tchrist, MετάEd, Kris Mar 16 '13 at 6:21

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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I'm not sure what you mean by "sarcasm" here. You may want to reword your question with an edit. –  J.R. Mar 15 '13 at 8:47
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I also don't see exactly how "sarcasm" fits here. If you say "You gotta love pussy!" to someone, does that somehow become sarcastic or not, depending on the gender and sexual orientation of either/both of you? –  FumbleFingers Mar 15 '13 at 13:58
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@FumbleFingers Add in personal taste, and that’s far too many axes of confusion to chart out. Best steer clear of that one. :) –  tchrist Mar 15 '13 at 14:02

2 Answers 2

May be a better way can be,"You are going to love xyz".

"You Gotta" is also written as "You got to..."

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Assuming the preference for something is only a feigned preference (which is often an element of irony and sarcasm), I suggest the following:

"Don't you just love it when _____ !"

Or, fleshed out,

"Don't you just love it when some jerk swerves suddenly in front of you and into your lane without using a turn signal?"

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