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I’m looking for a word that could be used to describe someone that does whatever he wants and doesn't listen to anyone else. Someone like Julius Caesar maybe?

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Julius Caesar wasn't a typical person but an emperor; he didn't do "whatever he pleased". People who do whatever they please can be called "solipsists" (those who believe "that the self is the only existent thing") or "sociopaths" ("a mentally ill or unstable individual; especially : one having an antisocial personality"). The nicest words for such people are "inconsiderate" and "egocentric". Anything else is a mealymouthed euphemism. –  user21497 Mar 15 '13 at 3:30
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3 Answers

headstrong - Self-willed and obstinate.
e.g.: I am headstrong and like getting my own way.

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Also see What do you call a person who does/thinks the opposite of the crowd for just that reason? and How to describe someone who often has his own idea and judgment, where words such as the following are suggested.

individualist, “Someone who does as they wish, unconstrained to external influences”
strong-minded, “Having a vigorous, independent will and views”
self-assertive, “determined to advance one's own personality or views”
iconoclast, “One who attacks cherished beliefs” (etc.)
contrarian, “a person who expresses a contradicting viewpoint, especially one who denounces the majority persuasion”
opinionated, “Holding to one's own opinion obstinately, stubbornly and unreasonably”
resolute, “Firm, unyielding, determined”

and per FumbleFingers, “nonconformist, renegade, maverick, rebel, radical, individualist, heretic, dissenter, dissident, iconoclast, loner, etc., etc.”

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Individualist seems most fitting. –  Robert Harvey Mar 15 '13 at 0:27
    
@RobertHarvey, based on its definition, I think so too. Feel free to vote this up – my vote for it doesn't seem to work. –  jwpat7 Mar 15 '13 at 0:32
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While it may have theological implications, antinomianist summarizes pretty much all you've described. An antinomianist makes the rules up as he goes along--as he sees fit. Antinomianists are a law unto themselves. They embody relativism and situational ethics in equal measure, with an egocentric twist. In short, they are more like Epicureans than Stoics, although you could make a case for Stoics' being against the law of appetites, passions, and pleasure, not wanting to come under the domination of such things. From Greek, anti + nomos, against law.

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