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What is the right way to do this sentence?

A and B where unique applications at the time of their launch. Both the products had the potential to succeed globally.

What I'm trying to say is: both the products had what it took to succeed globally and had global demand. But I just cant get it right.

What is the right way to do this?

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Such questions are considered off topic on this site. Please read through the FAQ for more information. –  coleopterist Mar 14 '13 at 7:53
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closed as off topic by coleopterist, tchrist, MετάEd, aedia λ, Kristina Lopez Mar 14 '13 at 18:02

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1 Answer

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The "where" should actually be "were". Apart from that, your sentences are absolutely correct. However, I would merge them into a single sentence.

Products A and B were one-of-a-kind applications at the time of their launch, and had the potential to succeed globally.

I am using the phrase "one-of-a-kind" to convey that the products A and B were different from other applications that were around at that time.

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In the original, I would eliminate the the after both: Both products had the potential to succeed globally. –  J.R. Mar 14 '13 at 9:11
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