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I'm looking for a word that would convey the idea of something that adresses a definite problem set and consequently lets you do so without much effort.

Here's an example:

  • Hammers are designed to drive nails
  • Hammers are consequently very easy to use to achieve that exact purpose
  • (And not very good at doing something else)

A small twist: I'm looking for words that emphasize the "designed to" aspect.

For example, appropriate wouldn't be entirely - well - appropriate because it conveys the idea that the tool happens to fit the bill, not that it was designed with the purpose of doing so.

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The Space Shuttle is designed for the express purpose of going up into orbit and is good for very little else, but I wouldn't say it is easy to achieve even in the Space Shuttle. –  Jim Mar 9 '13 at 2:08
    
Would you settle for a hyphenated word? purpose-built –  Jim Mar 9 '13 at 2:15
    
@Jim Indeed, the word I'm looking for - if it exists - wouldn't be appropriate to describe the space shuttle. –  Thomas Orozco Mar 9 '13 at 2:16
    
@Jim Thanks for your suggestion! I would, and purpose-built is an interesting choice. However, I think I'm looking for a word that would suggest the ease-of-use aspect. (Purpose built would be great for the space shuttle! ;) ) –  Thomas Orozco Mar 9 '13 at 2:18
    
I guess my point is that just because something is built for a clear-cut purpose doesn't necessarily mean that it works "out of the box." –  Jim Mar 9 '13 at 2:20
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2 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Optimized, from

optimal : The best, most favourable or desirable, especially under some restriction.

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Where is the "out-of-the-box" meaning of optimal? –  Jim Mar 9 '13 at 2:46
    
@Jim- You need to read through the whole comment string. I think the answer OP was looking for was not quite captured by the question as worded. –  Jim Mar 9 '13 at 4:51
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Ready-To-Use in general can be found by Googling. The object type might imply the purpose or use that it's ready for. (Obviously a ready-to-use lawnmower wouldn't be used for cooking.)

But for a specific purpose, that purpose can be include. The most common that I'm aware of are

  • ready-to-wear, for clothing
  • ready-to-fly, model airplanes and rockets
  • ready-to-eat, self explanatory

I thought this one was funny, because it's really not ready at all: "ready-to-assemble" :-)

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