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From an Information Technology perspective, what's the opposite of Proof of Concept?

I need to ask my client if they want us to build them a Proof-of-concept (app in its basic form) or a full-fledged version of the concept.

Now, am looking for a better word for "full-fledged version".

Or, do you think "full-fledged version" is OK?

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I wouldn't really call that an "opposite", though. –  Joe Z. Mar 8 '13 at 14:12
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I agree - the opposite would be no product at all. –  vonjd Mar 8 '13 at 14:13
    
See also this question. –  tchrist Mar 8 '13 at 14:36
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Opposite of "proof of concept"? "Disproof of concept"? While I've never heard this used, it is clearly needed for certain pieces of vaporware. –  Peter Shor Mar 8 '13 at 15:24

3 Answers 3

The opposite of a prototype — or a blueprint, or a sketch, or a mock-up, or a model — is a finished product or production version.

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I would call it a turnkey project. Wikipedia explains this as:

a type of project that is constructed so that it could be sold to any buyer as a completed product.

But with full-fledged version they would certainly know what you are referring to.

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It can be called as Beta Version or Feature Complete.

(Reference: see the Wikipedia article.)

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Beta still has the connotation of a product that is known to be not quite ready. Technically, you're right; a beta version should have everything the customer has asked for and behave as they said it should; the beta test period is where you discover anything that differs between "what they asked for" and "what they need/want". It is common knowledge, however, that those two rarely meet on the first try. –  KeithS Mar 8 '13 at 20:57

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