Take the 2-minute tour ×
English Language & Usage Stack Exchange is a question and answer site for linguists, etymologists, and serious English language enthusiasts. It's 100% free, no registration required.

The monthly rent shall be enhanced up to 10% every year

The monthly rent shall be enhanced by 10% every year

Note : used 'up to' instead of 'by' in above sentence.

share|improve this question

closed as off topic by tchrist, cornbread ninja 麵包忍者, Hellion, Kristina Lopez, simchona Mar 8 '13 at 19:05

Questions on English Language & Usage Stack Exchange are expected to relate to English language and usage within the scope defined by the community. Consider editing the question or leaving comments for improvement if you believe the question can be reworded to fit within the scope. Read more about reopening questions here.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
Welcome @user1010399! Please check out the new Stack Exchange site for English Language Learners. ell.stackexchange.com (I'd suggest using "increased" instead of "enhanced" in either of those sentences, by the way) –  Kristina Lopez Mar 8 '13 at 19:01
add comment

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I agree with Bill Franke. Your use of enhance is not appropriate. You have several options:

A. The monthly rent will be increased by 10 percent every year (meaning every year the
amount of increase will be 10 percent).

B. The monthly rent will be increased up to 10 percent every year (meaning a given year's increase could be as high as 10 percent, but it may be less than that).

C. The monthly rent shall be increased up to 10 percent every year (meaning an increase of up to 10 percent is mandated, but the increase may be less than that).

D. The monthly rent shall be increased by 10 percent every year (meaning a 10 percent increase is mandated every year).

I assume you are talking about the lease of a property? If so, the use of shall is preferable to will, as in options C and D.

share|improve this answer
add comment

The first sentence upto 10% says that rent may be enhanced anything between 0% to 10% every year where as the second gives the exactness i.e, the rent will be enhanced by 10% not less nor greater than 10%.

share|improve this answer
add comment

There's a semantic error: the word enhanced is wrong, wrong, wrong.

The monthly rent {will / shall [CHOOSE ONE]} {increase / rise / be raised [CHOOSE ONE]} up to 10% each year

is good American English (but not the only alternative). The choice between "will" and "shall" may be an American/British English choice.

"Up to 10%" can be replaced with "no more than 10%" or "exactly 10%", depending on which is preferred.

share|improve this answer
1  
+1 I think shall reflects a legal rather than a geographic dialect: will predicts, shall mandates. –  StoneyB Mar 8 '13 at 13:36
    
@StoneyB: I don't know. You could be right about that. You know more about these things than I do. I agree about the predict/mandate difference, though. –  user21497 Mar 8 '13 at 14:03
add comment

I feel that the best solution for this statement is:

Monthly rent may be increased by up to 10% each year.

or

The monthly rent may be increased by up to 10% each year.

The inclusion of "The" in the beginning gives the sentence an odd tone, though if monthly rent was referred to previously, it may be well-suited.

For a prospective renter, reading "may be increased" implies that there's a chance that rent will not be increased, whereas reading "will be increased" implies that rent will definitely be increased, regardless of the following "up to". This offers a strategic benefit.

And lastly, I feel that "by up to" rather than "up to" flows better. This may be my personal preference.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.