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Lets say, I have taken a resolution. And there are 5 steps in the process of accomplishing the resolution. Is there a word for each of those steps? A word other than "baby-step", "target", "milestone"?

  • Milestone sounds bigger than resolution itself.

  • Baby-step doesn't have the same seriousness as resolution.

  • Target sounds more like and end-point. But, we are looking at something that's somwhere in the path to the target.

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3  
Why call it a baby step when you can call it a step? –  coleopterist Mar 5 '13 at 15:10
1  
(As, indeed, you did in the question) –  Andrew Leach Mar 5 '13 at 15:15

5 Answers 5

If you are using this in a business context, go with milestone. Else, I would suggest either "phase" or "stage."

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I would just use step. As in first step, second step etc.

You could also go with objective, as in

I have achieved the third objective of my resolution.

In my opinion step is the best.

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"Tasks" or "Sub-tasks" can be used for the steps (though "step" is still a very servicable option). If you approach the resolution like a project, there is very useful information in this Wikipedia article on a project's work breakdown structure.

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Useful synonyms are event and waypoint - the latter would have my preference

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In business or software development context you can use it as a milestone or checkpoint but in context of resolutions or goals you can use "Step" or "Baby Step".

Baby step comes with a connotation that no matter how big or small you need to take the step (ACTION). Remember "A journey of 1000 miles begins with a step"

You take (baby) steps to reach a milestone.

Baby steps or Tiny Habits help you reach your goals or resolutions.

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