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I'm writing a paper on Daemonologie in Forme of a Dialogue, and I was wondering how I should cite King James I in my works cited page. This is King James I of England who was also King James VI of Scotland, and at the time he wrote this book, he was king of Scotland, but not yet king of England. Since he is now more well-known as James I, I was leaning more towards citing him this way:

King James I. Daemonologie in Forme of a Dialogue. Edinburgh, 1597.

Should I specify that he is King James I of England, since there was another King James I who was king of Scotland prior to this James's kingship? Should I cite him as James I? I've searched my MLA handbook, which states that titles of nobility should be omitted in works cited lists, but doesn't state whether or not the same should be done for royal titles.

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put on hold as off-topic by Rory Alsop, oerkelens, GMB, Josh61, Edwin Ashworth Jul 23 at 11:08

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Nevermind, I found the correct citation. It should be: James I, King of England. Daemonologie in forme of a dialogue. Edinburgh, 1597. –  jenn_h Mar 2 '13 at 0:17
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Please post your solution as an answer and accept it so the question can be marked as answered. –  terdon Mar 2 '13 at 17:15
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This question should be migrated to Writers –  Rory Alsop Jul 22 at 8:37

1 Answer 1

Nevermind, I found the correct citation. It should be: James I, King of England. Daemonologie in forme of a dialogue. Edinburgh, 1597.

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