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As a general guidelines EN10204 3.2 certification is applicable to all process wetted parts which include the Corrosion Inhibitor injection skid, Lube Oil Pumps, Pig traps, Pressure and Level Control Valves, MOV’s, Shutdown valves, Relief valves, manual valves of size 6” and above.

I am confused about whether the 6” and above is applicable to all valves or only the manual valves. What does that phrase qualify?

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It is ambiguous. Given that this is obviously part of a technical specification, you should seek clarification from whoever wrote it. –  Andrew Leach Feb 27 '13 at 13:14
    
With a comma separating the items in the list and no comma between the last list item and the qualifier, it is to be interpreted that 6" applies only to 'manual valves', the phrase immediately preceding of. There would have been a disambiguation in the sentence only if the qualifier is applicable to the list and not the adjacent item alone. –  Kris Feb 27 '13 at 13:32
    
It's only manual valves of size 6" and above. –  Benyamin Hamidekhoo Feb 27 '13 at 14:32
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closed as too localized by coleopterist, tchrist, cornbread ninja 麵包忍者, Kristina Lopez, MετάEd Feb 27 '13 at 18:58

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1 Answer

The most logical way to analyze this is to view the way it is being written from the perspective of the writer. Let's assume the writer wants the expression "of size 6” and above" to describe only manual valves. Instead of mentioning it at the last part of the sentence, mentioning it at the start (or other portion) of the sentence can sure avoid ambiguity.

....include manual valves of size 6” and above, the Corrosion Inhibitor injection skid, Lube Oil Pumps, Pig traps, Pressure and Level Control Valves, MOV’s, Shutdown valves and Relief valves.

Everything would be crystal clear. We can tell instantly that "of size 6” and above" describes only manual valves. If the writer has no intention of confusing the reader, he would definitely phrase it in this fashion. And thus I would argue that it describes every object in the list.

There is a logical explanation behind why the conjunction, "and", wasn't used before the last item.

... Shutdown valves, Relief valves and manual valves of size 6” and above.

The syntax {{A, B and C} of {y and z}} can easily be mistaken as {A, B and {C of y and z}}, even when Oxford commas are added.

... Shutdown valves, Relief valves , and manual valves of size 6”, and above.

For the reasons above, I believe the expression "of size 6” and above" describe not only the manual valves, the pig traps, but everything else in the list. However, I advise OP to seek clarification from whoever wrote it, as suggested by Andrew, because these reasons are, after all, based on the pure assumption that the writer is not trying to confuse us.

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By this reasoning, "of size 6” and above" applies not only to all valves but also to the Corrosion Inhibitor injection skid, the Lube Oil Pumps, and the Pig traps. I'm afraid you're overthinking it. The real answer is, you don't know the answer. Everything else is smoke and mirrors. Andrew's one-liner is exactly right and to the point. –  RegDwigнt Feb 27 '13 at 15:54
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@RegDwighт I agree that Andrew's one-liner is the most practical solution to this problem. But just a little bit of analysis won't hurt :) –  0arch Feb 27 '13 at 15:59
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