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Does the following sentence use the word "vested" correctly?

Those vested in keeping you from creating change want you to believe that change is futile.

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Have you looked up vest (verb) and vested interest? –  Andrew Leach Feb 26 '13 at 19:02

2 Answers 2

Yes, this use of "Vested" in the sentence...

Those vested in keeping you from creating change want you to believe that change is futile.

...would be correct.

Vested (as in "vested interest", as suggested by Andrew Leach), indicates ones "passion" for doing something.

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There is no better answer than a reason given in a comment (by Edwin Ashworth) on a now-deleted answer.

Power, authority, privileges, possessions can be vested in people. People are not vested in anything, according to the easily available quality dictionaries. So ‘Those vested in ...’ cannot be persons or other sentient beings. Yet they must be here, because they ‘want you to believe that change is futile’.

Thus “those vested in” is not correct.

“Those with vested interests in” would be correct.

Those with vested interests in keeping you from creating change want you to believe that change is futile.

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@EdwinAshworth If you want to give your answer to this question, I'll cheerfully delete this one. –  Andrew Leach Feb 27 '13 at 10:49

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