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I'm looking for two single words, a verb and a noun, with similar content, which could be best inserted in these sentences:

In some countries workers are entirely _______ 1 of/to/on their employers. No wage negotiations, no trade unions. This regularly experienced _______ 2 gravely violates human rights.

1 A verb meaning 'hanging on the rope of', more then just 'depending on'
2 Something more than 'exposedness', 'defencelessness', 'exploitation', but not as strong as 'slavery'

For those who, perhaps, know Hungarian, I'd like to find words for 'kiszolgaltatottak' and 'kiszolgaltatottsag' both coming from the same root 'szolga' (servant).

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Did you look for synonyms in a thesaurus of 'dependent'? –  Mitch Feb 23 '13 at 16:44
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What does “sy” (in the title) mean? It isn't an English word. If it's an abbreviation spell it out instead. -1. –  jwpat7 Feb 23 '13 at 18:03
    
@jwpat7 I think that's "somebody". However, the question can be made to work well enough without it. –  Andrew Leach Feb 23 '13 at 20:16
    
@Andrew, "somebody" seems plausible. If romist comes back and edits accordingly, I'll remove my downvote. –  jwpat7 Feb 23 '13 at 21:36
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2 Answers 2

Andrew Leach's at the mercy of is excellent. If however you require that your two terms be more closely related, and both related to the idea of servitude, I suggest:

In some countries workers are entirely bound by the will of their employers. No wage negotiations, no trade unions. This regularly experienced bondage gravely violates human rights.

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Servitude itself seems a good noun. –  TimLymington Feb 23 '13 at 23:22
    
@TimLymington Yah, but I couldn't find a closely cognate adjective/participle for his first term. –  StoneyB Feb 23 '13 at 23:28
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"Hanging on the rope of" is not an English idiom.

In the context of oppressive employers, one might say

In some countries workers are entirely at the mercy of their employers
In some countries workers are entirely owned by their employers

This last description has an obvious connotation of exploitation and slavery, but it's figurative and doesn't actually indicate a real ownership and slavery.

A suitable noun would be oppression.

This regularly-experienced oppression gravely violates human rights.

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Maybe not by a rope, but by a thread can various hang on or by, most typically doom — or spiders. :) And at last Ar-Pharazôn came even to Aman, the Blessed Realm, and the coasts of Valinor; and still all was silent, and doom hung by a thread. [...] There was a noise like the kicking of a flabby football, and the enraged spider fell off the branch, only catching itself with its own thread just in time. [...] Doom hangs still on a thread. [...] How thin indeed was the thread upon which doom still hung! [...] For he knew his deadly peril and the thread upon which his doom now hung. –  tchrist Feb 23 '13 at 18:15
    
@tchrist; Your non-arachnid quotations clearly refer to the Sword of Damocles (en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Damocles), which both Tolkien and Dunsany would have expected their readers to recognize; it doesn't seem a helpful image here. –  TimLymington Feb 23 '13 at 23:20
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