Take the 2-minute tour ×
English Language & Usage Stack Exchange is a question and answer site for linguists, etymologists, and serious English language enthusiasts. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I did a Google:define on Promptus and think it has Latin origin. But since I don't see it in the English dictionaries, I am not sure if I can use it at all in my conversation.

share|improve this question

closed as not a real question by FumbleFingers, tchrist, Kristina Lopez, cornbread ninja 麵包忍者, MετάEd Feb 20 '13 at 19:32

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

4  
Why do you think it is an English word in the first place? Please give some context. –  TimLymington Feb 20 '13 at 17:54
    
There's certainly a Latin word, promptus. It's where we get prompt in English. –  Jon Hanna Feb 20 '13 at 18:02
    
Looks like NARQ to me, regardless of where OP found the "word", and with what sense he wants to use it. –  FumbleFingers Feb 20 '13 at 18:04
1  
I've provided an answer, though I'm still at a loss as to why anyone would desire to use a word in conversation that they did not yet know. Surely the desire would come after the knowledge. –  Jon Hanna Feb 20 '13 at 18:11
    
often, they mistakenly speak of the promptus of love. sad, really. –  Dan Feb 20 '13 at 19:56

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

There is a Latin word promptus, from which we get prompt.

Burton's Legal Thesaurus glosses it as "expeditious, prompt, ready (prepared)".

So, while it's Latin, it has been used in English, in legal contexts at least.

share|improve this answer

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.