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Which is the correct sentence?

  • Some things will be known, but others will not.
  • Some things will be known, but others will not be.
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The second, I guess. –  Noah Feb 20 '13 at 10:04
4  
Both are fine. They are both derived from the sentence "Some things will be known, but others will not be known" through the process of ellipsis. –  Peter Shor Feb 20 '13 at 10:49
1  
"Which is the correct sentence" suggests a presumption that one of them is not correct. What could be the reason you thought so? They are both correct, as Peter Shore said, and mean the same thing. –  Kris Feb 20 '13 at 13:01
    
Thanks ! I do not know. I thought that the two following where fine: Some things will be known, but others will not. and Some things will be known, but others will not be known. But I was unsure about third alternative: Some things will be known, but other will not be. It sounds a little strange to me, that is all. But yes, elipsis is the magic word. –  dziadgba Feb 20 '13 at 13:38

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

All of these are OK, and mean the same thing:

Some things will be known, but others will not be known.

Some things will be known, but others will not be.

Some things will be known, but others will not.

Some things will be known, but not others.

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