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Where do I put a comma when I have quotes around a short story, and the sentence structure needs a comma? I know that, generally, commas go inside of quotes, but what if the quotes are marking a short story. Here is the part of the sentence I'm having trouble with:

Gertrude Stein’s The Gentle Lena is vastly different from Edith Wharton’s “The Other Two,” yet the two female leads ...

Should it look like that, or should it look like this:

Gertrude Stein’s The Gentle Lena is vastly different from Edith Wharton’s “The Other Two”, yet the two female leads ...

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marked as duplicate by Kris, MετάEd, Bill Franke, Matt Эллен, RegDwigнt Feb 19 '13 at 10:38

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Both examples have the comma in the same place, and it's fine there, denoting a brief pause when speaking. –  amanda witt Feb 19 '13 at 6:32
    
No they're different because the first sentence has a comma inside quotes while the second is outside the quotes. Does it matter where I put it? –  sarahbcknr Feb 19 '13 at 6:36
    
British practice would be to place the comma outside the closing quotation mark, because the comma is not part of the title. But why don't you put both titles in italics? You’d still need the comma, not to indicate a brief pause while speaking, but to help the reader understand the structure of the sentence. –  Barrie England Feb 19 '13 at 7:23

1 Answer 1

Italics (underlining in longhand) is used to indicate a title of a complete work: book, play, opera, publication, work of art, ship, etc. Quotation marks are to be used to indicate the title of a shorter work: short story, article, poem, song, chapter, etc. Commas and end marks (periods or fullstops, commas, exclamation marks, question marks)) are usually included inside the quotation mark or marks. So, Gertrude Stein’s The Gentle Lena is vastly different from Edith Wharton’s “The Other Two,” yet the two female leads ... is correctly punctuated. (Source: Warriner's English Grammar and Composition, First Course.)

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