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In the following sentence,

Parallel xxx products in the market will impact our sales.

What is the definition or meaning of "parallel xxx products"?

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closed as not a real question by Kris, Andrew Leach, Bill Franke, Robusto, FumbleFingers Jan 31 '13 at 15:42

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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Please quote more from that text –  mplungjan Jan 31 '13 at 6:42
    
There is no context for this sentence, I read poeple were discussing the translation of it in Sina Weibo (Chinese Twitter). –  user36806 Jan 31 '13 at 6:58
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If you can't tell us what was in the place of XXX then can you tell us what sort of word was there? (Unless it actually was XXX in the original, in which case it would mean "competing pornographic products that fill the same niche as our pornographic products"). –  Jon Hanna Jan 31 '13 at 10:59
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1 Answer 1

Based on the provided text, I expect that it simply means competing products. These could be products from competitors or from the same manufacturer. Products can also be introduced in parallel (at the same time).

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I think you are right on with competing. I think parallel probably refers to a nearly identical feature set rather than to time of introduction. –  Jim Jan 31 '13 at 7:00
    
Thank you. Could there be any other explanation, like counterfeit, or grey products? –  user36806 Jan 31 '13 at 7:00
    
@user36806 That cannot be inferred from the limited context that you've provided. –  coleopterist Jan 31 '13 at 7:02
    
While the blocking of a word doesn't help us, this is what I'd say too. I'd also understand it as not counterfeit or grey products, as their unfair path to the market would not parallel that of a legitimate product. –  Jon Hanna Jan 31 '13 at 11:29
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