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Which of these phrases is more correct?

The man who I know to be unhappy

The man whom I know to be unhappy

Is one of the verbs in the phrase more important, thus determining the noun case, or is something else happening with the particular combination of verbs? (The man whom I know is valid but the man to be unhappy isn't; the tense must be specified as in the man who is unhappy.)

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At first I thought this would be about constructions like "The man who jumped in the river and a shark attacked is now well on his road to recovery," where "jumped" wants "who" and "attacked" wants "whom". But in the example, there's only one relevant verb: "know". –  Peter Shor Sep 2 '11 at 14:15
    
The answer here is that "whom" is right but "who" is acceptable, but as I always say, when in doubt use "who". Avoid "whom" unless you're very sure. –  ShreevatsaR Sep 2 '11 at 15:59
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7 Answers 7

up vote 7 down vote accepted

In this instance, the pronoun "who" is the object of the verb "know". So you want to use objective case whom.

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The quantity of verbs has no effect on the choice between who and whom. The only thing you need to figure out is whether or not you need a subject for a verb.

If who/whom is the subject of a verb, use who. Otherwise, use whom.

The non-technical instruction on choosing the right word: Who can only be used as a subject, so if you don’t need a subject, don’t use who; use whom.

For this example, the correct choice is whom. “The man who/whom I know to be unhappy…” I suppose this is followed by a verb. The simple subject of the sentence (of the verb that follows) is man, not who/whom. Who/whom is not the subject of a verb, so you use whom.

Another way to write the example, which might make it easier to parse, is as follows: “The man, whom I know is unhappy,…” As we see, whom is not serving as the subject of any verb.

Source: Precise Edit

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Er, this isn't exactly correct. "The man, whom I know to be unhappy,..."; fine, we all agree there. But "the man, who[m] I know is unhappy,..." seems to have is as a main verb, in which case the pronoun is "who". –  TimLymington Aug 14 '11 at 21:51
    
@TimLymington The relevant question is whether who[m] is the subject of the verb in the subordinate clause. "The man whom I know is unhappy" has "The man" (np) as the subject of the verb "is" in the main clause. Who[m] only appears in the subordinate clause ("whom I know"), where it's pretty obvious that the verb is "know" and the subject is "I". –  Richard Gadsden Sep 1 '11 at 15:59
    
Returning to the original example, the whole thing is a noun phrase: "The man, whom I know to be unhappy, ...". The next thing should be the (transitive) verb of the main clause. The subordinate clause is "whom I know to be unhappy", and the subject of the verb "know" is "I", while "to be" is an infinitive with no subject (it's dependent on "know"). "Who[m]" is not a subject, so it's "whom", not "who". –  Richard Gadsden Sep 1 '11 at 16:02
    
@Richard: what would you say about "the man who[m], I know, is unhappy,..."? It's still a subordinate clause, but it's clearly who. –  TimLymington Sep 1 '11 at 21:23
    
@TimLymington, no, that's whom too. "The man who knows me" is the classic who. –  Richard Gadsden Sep 1 '11 at 22:00
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As the question is tagged with acceptability, I will report the following paragraph, reported by NOAD in the usage of who section:

The normal practice in modern English is to use who instead of whom (Who do you think we should support?) and, where applicable, to put the preposition at the end of the sentence (Who do you wish to speak to?). Such uses are today broadly accepted in standard English, but in formal writing it is best to maintain the distinction.

If you want to avoid writing who when you should use whom (or vice versa), you can use that.

the man that I know to be unhappy

That is a relative pronoun used to introduce a defining or restrictive clause, especially one essential to identification; it is used instead of when, which, who, whom.

the book that I have bought yesterday
the person that I will meet tomorrow
the year that Anna was born

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hmm. I read the question as having more to do with the proper case of who/whom? Isn't it about what role it plays in the clause? –  jlembke Jan 27 '11 at 6:03
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"I know the man to be unhappy" seems be more informative, but it doesn't answer the question until you change it again to "Him I know to be unhappy". Or how about "I know that man [him] to be unhappy. This would indicate that you want the objective case - whom.

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As I write, all other answers agree that whom is the correct choice in this construction (because "whom I know to be unhappy" is an auxiliary phrase, wherein whom is not the subject of a verb).

I don't dispute the strict grammatical position, but I would say that, as suggested by this NGram, whom appears to be increasingly falling into disuse.

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Correspondingly, here are over 1000 written instances of "who I know to", most if not all of which are "incorrect" according to strict grammar. In my opinion, whom is already becoming somewhat 'dated', and it's only a matter of time before it disappears completely.

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To answer the direct question ...

Verb clauses can be nested and are parsed from the inner most to the outermost. so "I know 'x to be" is a verb clause which after being parsed would resolve effectively to "is" and therefore your second statement is true - it the correct stereotype verb clause would be "the man who is unhappy".

The response to the other comment - I don't know if this a culture thing but I do not find it to be correct usage to replace who with that. That can only be used when talking about NOT-people.

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But it is "I know him to be unhappy" not "I know he to be unhappy". –  Kosmonaut Feb 23 '11 at 2:37
    
Maybe it's a culture thing. I don't see any problem with using "that" for a person; as exemplified by @kiamlaluno's answer. –  user16269 Jan 19 '12 at 9:53
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The main verb in your question is "know", so it is "The man whom I know to be unhappy", just as it is "The man whom I know".

It gets more complex if you replace 'to be' with 'is', as there are several possible meanings. "The man who, I know, is unhappy" is equivalent to "The man who is unhappy (I know it)", so whom would be wrong. "The man, whom I know, is unhappy" = "The man is unhappy: I know him (not he). Without any commas, or (just as wrong) with a single comma after 'know', ambiguity makes it impossible to say what the pronoun should be (unless the rest of the sentence makes it clear). Moral: punctuation is important, and don't lazily cut "to be" down to "is" unless you are clear about how you are changing the meaning.

NB Precise Edit's answer (quoted by Lauren), leaves out all the commas in this phrase, so isn't helpful.

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