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I want to know how one can manage to assert that they are laughing without using euphemisms or colloquialism in first person, for example in a letter, without referring to yourself, that is saying "me" or "I". These examples seem impossible:

  • The chicken wanted to cross the road because it wanted to reach the other side. Haha!
  • The chicken wanted to cross the road because it wanted to reach the other side. LOLZ.
  • The chicken wanted to cross the road because it wanted to reach the other side. :-P
  • The chicken wanted to cross the road because it wanted to reach the other side. (laughing with mouth foolishly open and smells bad breath)

Side-note: Please pardon that poor humor I have taken as an example.

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How about, simply, "That makes me laugh"? –  Robusto Jan 26 '13 at 14:37
    
Why would you want to say you are laughing without bringing your point of view into the conversation? Even an emoji does that. –  Robusto Jan 26 '13 at 14:45
    
@Robusto An emoji in a letter? –  Parth Kohli Jan 26 '13 at 14:46
    
You think emoji can't be put on paper? –  Robusto Jan 26 '13 at 14:47
    
If the humour was Groucho-standard, your laughter would be assumed. –  Edwin Ashworth Jan 26 '13 at 15:25
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4 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I am not sure if there are better alternatives but 'Ha ha!', 'Lolz', 'Rofl' etc., are the most common ways to show in an informal written dialogue or conversation that you are laughing without mentioning it explicitly. Of course, terms like 'Lolz' and 'Rofl' evolved thanks to the Internet usage but they have become quite a trend.

Your question, however, – 'how one can manage to assert that they are laughing without using euphemisms or colloquialism in first person', might be answered with a simple phrase like 'that makes me laugh' as Robusto suggests in the comments above.

Edit:

If this is what you are looking for (as I tried in my comment below) –

1) It's difficult not to laugh but the chicken wanted to cross the road because...
2) It's hard not to laugh but the chicken wanted to cross the road because...
3) Can't help laughing but the chicken wanted to cross the road because...

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Good, but can you let me know phrases that suggest you are laughing without using me or I? –  Parth Kohli Jan 26 '13 at 15:23
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@Novice: 'Can't help laughing but the chicken wanted to cross the road because it wanted to reach the other side!' or 'It's hard not to laugh but the chicken wanted to cross the road because it wanted to reach the other side!' –  user32480 Jan 26 '13 at 15:31
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You can certainly do it if you put your "indicator" before the thing that makes you laugh...

Amusingly, I can't think of a suitable witticism to follow my answer word!

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You could express your laughing reaction to the joke in one of the following ways (roughly ordered from most formal to most casual):

He/the comedian said "The chicken wanted to cross the road because it wanted to reach the other side" and I laughed (a lot).

He/the comedian said "The chicken wanted to cross the road because it wanted to reach the other side" and I laughed until I cried.

He/the comedian said "The chicken wanted to cross the road because it wanted to reach the other side" and I (almost) killed myself/died/wet myself laughing.

He/the comedian said "The chicken wanted to cross the road because it wanted to reach the other side" and I almost peed myself/my pants laughing.

He/the comedian said "The chicken wanted to cross the road because it wanted to reach the other side" and I laughed my ass off. (The SMS/text acronym is LMAO)

He/the comedian said "The chicken wanted to cross the road because it wanted to reach the other side" and I almost bust a gut.

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I don't think these are going to cut the mustard. Firstly, OP asked for ways to do it without referring to himself, which all of them do. Secondly, he asked for a formal solution, which most of them obviously aren't. –  FumbleFingers Jan 26 '13 at 15:18
    
You are right. I totally missed that part of the request. I would meekly offer the following as an acceptable option - "He/the comedian said "The chicken wanted to cross the road because it wanted to reach the other side." It was hilarious/side-splitting/funny/really funny/quite a laugh.... –  Shawn Mooney Jan 26 '13 at 15:28
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Without referring directly to oneself, it is possible to suggest that a state of amusement follows the statement:

  • The chicken wanted to cross the road because it wanted to reach the other side. Cue laughter...
  • The chicken approached the road wanting to reach the other side - with hilarious consequences!
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