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Australia day is nearly upon us! And that means it's time to throw another chop on the barbie and say real Aussie things like "dinky die".

Stone the crows, what's that even mean, "dinky die"? I've been saying it for years in sentences like

I'm true blue, fair dinkum, ridgy didge, dinky die Aussie.

Does anyone know where "dinky die" came from and the correct usage?

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closed as general reference by simchona Jan 22 '13 at 6:05

This question is too basic; it can be definitively and permanently answered by a single link to a standard internet reference source designed specifically to find that type of information.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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up vote 2 down vote accepted

Wiktionary says it's an adjective meaning:

  1. (Australian slang) Genuine, true.

  2. (Australian slang, by extension) Authentically Australian.

  3. (Australian slang) Honest, on the level.

  4. (Australian slang) True blue, steadfastly loyal.

And etymology:

Fanciful diminutive form of dinkum.

It's use goes back at least as far as this 16 November 1917 song in the Cairns Post (Qld. : 1909 - 1954), where it's used six times:

THE DINK Y-DI SOLDIER. [The Sole Property of Ernest Lauri.]

...

Warm blankets at night, an enj-yable day,
A nobleman's life, an' a gentleman's pay,—
Be a sport, an' a dinky-di soldier!"

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