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You are a creator. You are fearless. Though you lack expertise at the moment, your work has the ability to be decent most of the time. You tinker, you fail. You keep failing and start seeing the light.

There are moments, though sometimes short lived, where you create a masterpiece and it becomes an instant hit. A wild hit, where your inner self knows it has a hit in the pocket.

This can be a photograph, a dish or an ingenious solution to a difficult problem.

How would you define such moments? Is there a phrase or a word to describe this situation?

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How about blind luck? (Offered tongue-in-cheek, with a dash of sincerity thrown in). –  J.R. Jan 19 '13 at 19:39
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@J.R. How about "stroke of luck"? I have found it using Google, but I cannot write the Italian version. –  user19148 Jan 19 '13 at 21:35
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Your title mentions "first attempt", your description makes no mention of it. What exactly are you looking for? –  prash Jan 19 '13 at 23:17
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@Carlo_R.: I like that suggestion – a lot. In fact, there are two idioms that could be applied, stroke of genius (from NOAD: an outstandingly brilliant and original idea), or stroke of luck (a fortunate occurrence that could not have been predicted or expected). I think either of these might be apt ways to describe "moments .. where you create a masterpiece and it becomes an instant hit." I might use stroke of genius when I wanted to emphasize the inventor's creativity, and stroke of luck when I wanted to emphasize conditions being just right for the product to become a huge success. –  J.R. Jan 20 '13 at 8:23
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8 Answers 8

up vote 6 down vote accepted

The golf metaphor "hole in one" could be appropriate.

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Golf metaphors are never appropriate ;) –  Lucas Jan 20 '13 at 2:25
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You might refer to it as a watershed moment, after which everything is changed.

watershed
3. A critical point that marks a division or a change of course; a turning point:

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This is often known as a "Eureka" moment, after the ancient inventor Archimedes, who said, "Eureka," (I have found it) when he made an important discovery.

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Was that discovery made in his first attempt? The answer is "No". Eureka is used to describe a discovery made accidentally rather than on the first attempt necessarily. –  Mohit Jan 19 '13 at 18:21
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"Beginner's luck" is sometimes used to describe that phenomenon which parodoxically can be used by both the person who performed the act, in a show of modesty (false or genuine),

or

It can be used against the performer of the act to diminish the value of that achievement.

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The term peak experience is often used to describe such a moment. This term was extensively discussed by psychologist Abraham Maslow.

This link lists some of the scholarly articles relation to this concept

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I would say, "slam-dunk". Maybe, "boo-yah." This is what I would say to myself. The actual moment of realization in time would be considered an epiphany. The self pat-on-the-back would be the slam-dunk, the boo-yah.

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moment of vindication

Top Chef Power Rankings

I experienced a rare moment of vindication with last week’s Power Rankings. The way Top Chef is designed, there are few scenarios wherein a person’s relative worth can be specifically measured. The head to head competition was refreshing in this regard. In every instance but one, the higher seed in my power rankings emerged victorious in head to head battle.

Paul Kimmage interview on Off the Ball

The Off the Ball team and Newstalk Sport team made a commitment to keep the issue of doping in cycling on the air, and this interview with Paul Kimmage, in the wake of Lance Armstrong’s shaming in the USADA report, was a wonderful moment of vindication for Kimmage and those who had fought against doping in cycling for so many years.

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I would say your idea "has legs"/"has got some legs".

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