Take the 2-minute tour ×
English Language & Usage Stack Exchange is a question and answer site for linguists, etymologists, and serious English language enthusiasts. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I saw the name Zacharias Mulletstein in a newsgroup and thought "what a peculiar yet interesting name." When I mentioned this name to a friend (because the post by this fella was amusing) they said "Oh come now. That person really needs to get a better name."

So I'm wondering, what is the meaning of this name? I couldn't find anything useful from Google aside from more postings by this person, and I neglected to ask my friend why they thought that about this name.

Thanks a lot for any insight you can provide, even if only for one half of the name.

share|improve this question

closed as too localized by Robusto, Kristina Lopez, JSBձոգչ, Carlo_R., FumbleFingers Jan 15 '13 at 22:09

This question is unlikely to help any future visitors; it is only relevant to a small geographic area, a specific moment in time, or an extraordinarily narrow situation that is not generally applicable to the worldwide audience of the internet. For help making this question more broadly applicable, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

3  
A mullet is a type of hairstyle: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mullet_%28haircut%29 –  JAM Jan 15 '13 at 19:03
1  
@JAM put that as an answer. The mullet is a derided hairstyle. –  Marcus_33 Jan 15 '13 at 19:06
    
Are you sure it has any significant meaning? Maybe it's just someone's name. –  Jay Jan 15 '13 at 20:23

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Zacharias is a variant of Zechariah which is a biblical name meaning "Yahweh has remembered".

No idea about Mulletstein (family names are almost always harder anyway), but I suspect what triggered your friend's response is that mullet has several meanings one of which is a haircut which is short on the top and sides and long at the back, fashionable in some subcultures in the 70s and 80s but later much-mocked to the point of being a punchline.

share|improve this answer
    
the -stein ending is almost definitely a reference to Frankenstein –  Kevin Jan 15 '13 at 19:30
    
Business in front, party in the back. –  MT_Head Jan 15 '13 at 19:40
    
Wow! That Zacharias variant explanation makes perfect sense actually because his messages are posted mostly in atheist forums, protesting atheism. Since that poster is also a troll, the "much-mocked" part also fits well. Thank you very much. –  user35789 Jan 15 '13 at 20:13
    
"Stein" is German for "stone". It is found in some Eastern European Jewish names, like "Bernstein" (burned-stone), "Goldstein" (gold-stone) and "Epstein" (I have no idea what an "ep" is). What this has to do with mullets I don't know, whether "mullet" has another meaning or if this is just a joke. –  Jay Jan 15 '13 at 20:22

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.