0
votes
0answers
5 views

A word for killing a cousin

Almost every type of killing can be described in a single word such as suicide, parricide, genocide, etc. Is there such a term for killing a cousin specifically?
0
votes
0answers
5 views

Is this sentence structure correct? I catch myself using this structure a lot

This is a line from a story I'm writing: "The blanket had been peeled back, revealing imprints of recent slumber." Is this correct or should I make another sentence for the second clause?
1
vote
3answers
32 views

Can “backup” be used as a verb in the context of data management?

I have heard backup being used as a verb in the sense of I have to backup my hard disk by non-native English speakers (the English noun backup is also used in other languages, for example in ...
3
votes
6answers
25 views

Term between 'mentoring' & 'rubber ducking'

This may be a Programmers Stack Exchange question, but I don't think so, because I don't believe there is an accepted term for this in the industry, so I turn to all of you for suggestions. Say I'm ...
-1
votes
0answers
10 views

“described by either … or …” or described either by… or by…"?

I write a sentence like follows: This could not simply be described by either A or B. I was wondering may be the following is correct: This could not simply be described either by A or by B. ...
1
vote
1answer
28 views

Capitalizing First Letter of Word in Continuing Dialogue

I have a rather tricky question - I'm a writer, about to send my manuscript off to agents and publishers, and have noticed I have a rather strange writing style, particularly when it comes to ...
2
votes
1answer
62 views

From a non-native's standpoint: Which dictionary should I pay attention to when I find semantically contradictory definitions of a word?

[The following is one of dozens of cases I come across on a daily basis] By accident, I have recently noticed that the phrasal verb go through (as in experience) -- which I've been using so far in my ...
4
votes
3answers
135 views

Better term for “intellectual jokes”

What can you call a joke, pun, or anything funny that likely needs intelligence to get? All I can come up with is intellectual jokes; is there another word for this? EDIT: A one-word answer would ...
-2
votes
0answers
18 views

Need suggestions

I was working on my resume. I need a more assertive and strong sentence in place of the following: Interacted with xyz team for deciding work flow and schedules. I would like to replace "Interacted ...
0
votes
0answers
14 views

Is it “shouldn't we?” “No, we should not” or “Yes, we should not”. And why? [duplicate]

As the title says: Someone wants something done: "Shouldn't we go to the park?" Someone else answers, saying that we should not go to the park. Would the answering person say Yes, we should not! ...
0
votes
2answers
30 views

What does “Our climate is indisposed to favour us even this once” mean?

Please help me to understand the meaning of this expression: Our climate is indisposed to favour us even this once. (The Cherry Orchard). What does "even this once" mean in this phrase?
-1
votes
1answer
42 views

What's this word? [on hold]

I'm watching a video on youtube and just heard a new word/expression that I can't seem to spell "right enough" to have google correct me and bring me to its definition. I've included the context and ...
2
votes
0answers
39 views

Irony - Alanis Morisette Song

This is old news ...but I am having trouble understanding why some of Alanis Morisette's examples from her song 'Ironic' are not ironic. For example: "An old man turned ninety-eight. He won the ...
-1
votes
0answers
24 views

How to express something like “Help me in silence”

One of my friend always helps me and does not want me to know that he helps me. I want to thank him. The expression I think would be "Thank you for always helping me silently". But it seems this ...
0
votes
0answers
14 views

Do these sentences make sense?

Notwithstanding the argument, I would still consider you as a friend. I was exhausted, notwithstanding I stayed up for another two hours. Maybe too formal to use in everyday writing as a word for ...
0
votes
2answers
50 views

Is there a word to describe the positioning of words directly below other words, as in translations

I was hoping to use a word to say that in a song lyric, the translation of the original language appears directly below the original language throughout the song, without having to say all that. I ...
3
votes
3answers
288 views

Americans do not use word “Delicious” quite often

I am a foreigner and now I am in America. I always use the word "Delicious" if I like this food. For example, "This meat is so delicious". But one of my friends, who is not a native speaker, once told ...
0
votes
1answer
61 views

Obsolete language.

Is it appropriate to use obsolete words in a modern-day essay? For example, using "unto' instead of "until"? Or will the teacher who is marking your essay just think that you're a pretentious student ...
3
votes
0answers
62 views

Why is Gilt a word when we have Gilded? Is this town big enough for the both of them?

We would never say "I builded my own house", and we would never say "I ment my fences" - as far as I can tell, words either went the d-to-t route, or they went the add-ed route. Gild, for some reason, ...
0
votes
3answers
39 views

What is the correct expression: “the estimate number” or “the estimated number?”

I have been looking for a place that tells me which expression is correct, but I didn't get any satisfactory answer. Google returns 2,060,000 results for "the estimate number of *", and 73,200,000 ...
0
votes
0answers
58 views

A word to describe a lot of people who lie on a place [on hold]

Is there a word/expression to describe a lot of people who lie on a place like the image below shows.
0
votes
2answers
57 views

Is there any difference at all between these three sentences?

I figured you wouldn't come if I had told you. I figured you wouldn't have come if I told you. I figured you wouldn't have come if I had told you.
9
votes
10answers
387 views

Is there a verb meaning “to make similar”?

I'm attempting to document a change that will make two things more congruent. I'd like to use a word in this way: This change [makes similar] the two items. The best I've been able to find by ...
0
votes
3answers
73 views

Noun to describe a “typo-filled” letter

I am changing my e-mail signature on my phone to read: Sent from my Samsung Galaxy S4. Please do not mistake my brevity and/or misspellings for apathy and/or ignorance. I am looking for a ...
-2
votes
0answers
36 views

Is there a term for 'Disregarding a persons opinion/argument because they haven't experienced it.'?

So today I was talking to some people at work about the health issues surrounding cigarettes and marijuana. I have no problem with either of those things but when people say there are absolutely no ...
0
votes
2answers
30 views

Looking for a folk saying or proverb that reflects “the closer, higher the competition”

I am looking for an American or UK folk saying or proverb that reflects the following idea: the closer are the players, the higher is the competition or the more level the playing field, the more ...
1
vote
0answers
51 views

Subject/Complement Agreement. How to describe problem with “The thing is the objects.”

In http://ell.stackexchange.com/questions/29140/is-or-are-the-only-thing-that-i-want-you-to-hit-right-now-is-are-the-books/29170#29170, I provided the following, problematic, wording (especially bold ...
1
vote
2answers
80 views

Professional term for “Apples to apples” comparison

Is there a term which would sound more fitting in an academic or professional setting for describing a comparison between two things highlighting the similarity of the measurement/comparison process?
0
votes
0answers
17 views

When should you use an article at the beginning of a sentence? [on hold]

I'm helping a non-native English speaker with proofreading a work. I know that if there is a singular improper noun at the beginning, you use an article, but are there anymore rules? I'm finding that ...
0
votes
2answers
40 views

Is “Unless if” grammatically incorrect?

A friend pointed out to me recently that I have a tendency to preface some of my sentences with the phrase "Unless if..." For example: Unless if we take the highway, we won't make it in time. ...
0
votes
2answers
40 views

has been going to have finished

I came across this sentence: For four months now John has been going to have finished his novel by today. I would like to know if "John has been going to have finished…" is the structure going ...
-1
votes
1answer
39 views

Is “Universityhood” a valid English word? [on hold]

This is a theme during the foundation day of a college, "Nurturing Elders' Legacy and Aspiring for Excellent Quest as a Keystone into University". Isn't it universityhood instead of just university? ...
0
votes
0answers
31 views

How do you slip info into a story without making it sound like a history lesson or monologue? [on hold]

I want to make my writing sound more personal, yet uncompromising with regards to information. How do I achieve that with my characters? What I do is let the character mention it in the most ...
0
votes
0answers
11 views

Regarding abbreviations in chapter/section titles in a technical text

What is common practice regarding the use of abbreviations in chapter/section titles in a technical text? Is it encouraged? Should it be avoided? Is it preferable to include the full name of the term ...
5
votes
10answers
601 views

A word or phrase for 'Holy grail' (a goal impossible to achieve)

I am looking for a word or phrase that means "a long sought out goal that seems impossible to achieve" but without any religious connotations. Any suggestions? My intended usage is as follows: ...
0
votes
2answers
32 views

“Britain’s recovery outstrips the world”

The title of one of the leading articles in today's (London's) Times is: Britain’s recovery outstrips the world Shouldn't it be Britain's recovery outstrips the world's?
8
votes
9answers
810 views

What is meant by “same difference”?

Unless you are comparing two different sets of items to then have a couple of differences and the differences are the same, I do not get it. This would be analogous to: 12-9=3, 7-4=3. Here we have ...
-1
votes
1answer
32 views

Using conjunction “while” as an archaic prepositonal form for “until”

In my Penguin English Dictionary, I've encountered the word while marked as an archaic form for the preposition until. Furthermore, according to my online research, Oxford Dictionary states that it is ...
0
votes
0answers
31 views

What's the point in saying “I could care less”? [duplicate]

To care less would mean the caring is more, having room to care less.
4
votes
4answers
64 views

Is there a word for the status of a team being 'home' or 'away'

A team can be 'home' or 'away' - but what is this status called? At first I thought 'location' or 'venue' but this isn't right - the location is singular and the basis of what determines the 'home' ...
0
votes
1answer
40 views

Should an apostrophe be used with a z at the end of a word?

I know that if a word ends with an s then it should be made plural or possessive by use of an apostrophe with no extra s (e.g. "Thomas Harris' book was a riveting read." as opposed to "Gary Barlow's ...
0
votes
3answers
34 views

What's the meaning of “what gets put where”?

I came across the following sentence: What gets put where determines the particular type of the architecture. What's the meaning of the phrase in bold?
0
votes
3answers
56 views

Is this sentence correct: I could not keep calm?

How can I say when I know that I do something badly, but I can't keep calm. E.G. - She asked me don't tell you, but I couldn't ... I hope you understand what I meant. :)
-1
votes
1answer
36 views

What are the differences and similarities between what “asocial” and “antisocial” mean?

Is an "asocial" guy hostile and destructive or is he just unwilling to interact and avoiding company of others? Is antisocial the same thing? The dictionary says it means opposing established ...
0
votes
1answer
41 views

Proportion of unique words in typical English text?

I recall hearing a statistic that, in a typical block of English text (e.g. a novel) a really suprisingly large proportion (a third? half?) of the distinct words that appear, appear only once. That ...
0
votes
1answer
32 views

Syntax of “not only” + “furthermore”

Can I use not only with furthermore instead of also? Not only is he tall, he is also heavy. Can I say or write: Not only is he tall, he is furthermore heavy. or (and please tell me if this ...
0
votes
1answer
31 views

Word combination with “eternally”

I am currently thinking of engraving text for our wedding rings. Idea is to engrave some nice combination of two words (one word per ring) in order to get phrase close to “forever together”. I do ...
1
vote
2answers
24 views

Considering - meaning in this sentence

What is the meaning of considering in this sentence? We're just fine, considering.
1
vote
1answer
68 views

Is “thank's” an alternative correct spelling?

My colleague who is American spells "thank's" (with an apostrophe) and when I ask him why he said because it's "more formal" and "he uses American English". Is this true? Can you really spell ...
0
votes
0answers
9 views

Is my header grammatically correct [duplicate]

I have a list of item to sell. So my header is Selling items list and again there are item list that i want to buy so header is Buying item list Are both header grammatically correct? Is there any ...

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